The device works by heating a vessel of water until the water inside boils.

 

The steam created inside the vessel propels the nozzles on the sphere round creating kinetic energy.

This is a row of Panemone Windmills in Iraq, the oldest known form of wind-powered machinery in the world.


Panemone windmills had fabric sails which span around, they were first used to pump water and then helped grind grain to make flour.

A Sail boat catches the

fast winds, using its force to move against the rivers current.

They were invented in what's known as The Golden Age of Islam - and were between the 8th and 10th Century, but we don't know an exact date. This means they were invented when Vikings were settling in the UK, and possibly during the time of Alfred the Great.

Imagine you are an inventor, in your workshop, and you can create any means of transportation you imagine!

Connections are important.

 

If people can’t get to Stirchley, then they can’t bring the materials to make things; you can’t take your work to sell; and you can’t learn new things about the world.

 

Connecting us to new places is one of the many things that allow us to follow our dreams and accomplish our goals...

For this workshop, we'd like you to dream up new modes of transport! The transports you design must help people who live in Stirchley, maybe they help the local wildlife too?

 

Maybe your new modes of transportation change the air in the sky or the way people feel?

 

Don’t worry about how realistic or practical your drawing is- be as imaginative and fantastical as you like!

The Stirchley Tapestry:

A Tapestry of Imagined Futures

We’d like to make a tapestry of ideas for communities of the future - and we’d like the ideas to come from you!

 

We’re looking for imaginings of new buildings, energy sources, transport systems, ways of growing food and all kinds of new inventions that will help us design communities that are safe, sustainable and for everyone... 

Although this is a drawing series, if you want to respond to these workshops in any other way, for example, sound and music, sculpture, craft or film, then please do, all work can become part of this overall project.

Over 7 weeks of lockdown, a new worksheet will appear online for you to do at home. The workshops will go as follows:

All your drawings, designs and ideas will be collected together and become one long tapestry! When you have drawn your ideas, take a photo of them and email them to hipkissandgraney@outlook.com.

 

This will become an epic artwork made by everyone in Stirchley during the Coronavirus pandemic. 

Workshop 1: future buildings

Imagine you are a builder - you can build anything you can imagine! The buildings you design must help people who live in Stirchley, maybe they help the local wildlife too? Maybe your buildings change the air in the sky or the way people feel?

 

Don’t worry about how realistic or practical your drawing- is be as imaginative and fantastical as you like!

Stirchley is a land of builders!

 

It has lots of building merchants, timber yards and factories. It’s a place where people go to build and fix things! 

What buildings are in Stirchley now?

Stirchley is home to lots of interesting buildings of all different designs and purposes! Here are just three interesting buildings in Stirchley... 

The Bike Foundry is a bike shop and repair centre, in Stirchley. It fixes old bicycles and then sells them to other people.

 

Their use of recycling and mending offers people a healthy and carbon neutral alternative to driving cars, making everyone healthier!

Birmingham Bike Foundry

Loaf is a bakery and cookery school in Stirchley. They bake breads and pastries and work with other cooks and chefs to teach others how to cook food.

Loaf Bakery and Cookery School

Stirchley Baths was built for everyone to come and

wash themselves in a safe and well-equipped environment.

 

It made everyone, who lived around it, healthier

and happier. Today, Stirchley Baths is home

to Stirchley Community Market.

It also has a cinema room for film

events and its main hall offers

a space to local groups.

Stirchley Baths

These workshops are designed for all ages as well as individuals, friends and families.

 

Drawing ability is not important, it’s about fun, imagination and a nice big group project the whole community can work on even when physically distant from each other. Have Fun!

 

We hope you’ll enjoy this series of art workshops from Considered Mischief! If you have any questions, then please don’t hesitate to get in touch at hipkissandgraney@outlook.com.

Workshop 2: New Ways To Travel

Stirchley has lots of different landscapes and terrains.

 

It has waterways, hills, fields and woodlands. 

How do people travel in Stirchley?

Stirchley is an ancient settlement. Humans have been travelling through for hundreds of years. Here are some of the ways we have traversed the land... 

Roman Roads

People have been passing through Stirchley for centuries. 

 

A Roman road used to pass through Stirchley long ago- and people would walk or travel by horse and cart. The Roman Army used them to get from one fortification to the next quickly. Roman roads rose in the middle and had gutters on each side to ensure they didn't flood!

Stirchleys first buses were pulled along by horses! How would you change our buses today? How could they be improved?

The canals which pass through Stirchley were first opened in 1815. These connect us to Worcester and Stratford. 

Alongside the canals are pathways so people can walks and cycle along them too.

How can you use the canals to

connect us to the world?

Would you redesign the

classic narrowboat?

The Worcester Birmingham canal

Horse-drawn buses

Cable-hauled Trams used to run up and down the Pershore Road and connect Stirchley to other areas of Birmingham.

They were removed to make Birmingham a city for cars.

Would you bring the trams back to Stirchley?

What would you create to help everyone get around? 

 

Would it fly? Would it have wheels?

 

Does it run on water, or air, or something else?

 

What would you call it?

Cable-hauled Trams

These workshops are designed for all ages as well as individuals, friends and families.

 

Drawing ability is not important, it’s about fun, imagination and a nice big group project the whole community can work on, even when physically distant from each other. Please enjoy and send your artworks along to hipkissandgraney@outlook.com when you're done!

 

We hope you’ll enjoy this series of art workshops from Considered Mischief! If you have any questions, then please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

Imagine you are a scientist, in your laboratory, and you begin to work on an entirely new type of energy that will save the world and help everyone on the planet!

Since ancient times, humans have harnessed all types of different energise to help them explore, learn and build our world...

Some forms of energy production have devastated our planets ecology.

Since learning about the damage we have been causing through energy production, scientists have created lots of new types of energy called RENEWABLES. 

 

that are renewable and don't harm the environment.

"Renewable" means the source of the energy won't run out.

Wind Power

Sailing ships and Windmills

What are the different types of renewable energy?

Wind Turbines.

Wind Turbines generate electricity through the wind. 

The wind blows the turbines round, creating kinetic energy which moves the dynamo creating electric energy!

Onshore wind farms and solar farms are now the cheapest source of electricity in the world.

Steam Power

The Aeolipile or Hero Engine

How does the Aeolipile it work?

The Aeolipile, or, Hero Engine, is considered to be the first thermal engine, or steam turbine, in history. 

Built by Hero of Alexandria in 130 BC.

Hero studied the works of Egyptian mathematician and inventor, Ctesibius.

Ctesibius, who lived in Alexandria during the reign of the Ptolemys, studied the science of compressed air and it's uses in pumps.

Workshop 3: Energy Sources!

Solar Power

Solar energy is created by harnessing light and heat from the Sun. It's like an artificial photosynthesis! There are lots of different ways to create energy from the Sun and our technology is advancing all the time!

Creating a new energy source!

For this workshop, we'd like you to dream up a new way to make energy!

Don’t worry about how realistic or practical your idea is- the more imaginative and fantastical the better!

What to draw?

You can draw the ways in which you make this energy?

You can draw ways in which the energy is used?

You can draw the way your energy is extracted or transformed?

 
 
 

Design Your Own Engine!

Imagine a small city with lots of homes and business.

 

What type of engine will you design? What will it be used to power? Would it power the buildings and transports you designed in workshop 1 and 2?

Would your engine be powered by the sun? This is called Solar energy?

...maybe it's powered by the moon!

Or...

Draw your engine being used in a city, or town, or village or forest, or ocean or where ever it is used...

These workshops are designed for all ages as well as individuals, friends and families.

 

Drawing ability is not important, it’s about fun, imagination and a nice big group project the whole community can work on, even when physically distant from each other. Please enjoy and send your artworks along to hipkissandgraney@outlook.com when you're done!

 

We hope you’ll enjoy this series of art workshops from Considered Mischief! If you have any questions, then please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

 

Workshop 4: Food sources of the future!

Imagine you are twenty years in the future. Food is scarce and the land we used to farm is no longer fertile...

 

Now, you are back in the present.

You are part of a team of engineers, chefs, cultural historians and biochemists in a science facility.

You have all come together to begin work on an entirely new type of food production that will save the world and help everyone on the planet!

TIP: Solutions are easier to find when you have a more diverse team of people. Enlist more people into your research core!

How are we currently approaching the food crisis?

Fortunately, there are teams of people around the globe researching and experimenting with amazing new kinds of food production. Let's have a look at some of these new ideas and methods now...

Agroforesty

Growing Forests and Crops Together

Agroforestry is a way of growing fresh fruit and vegetables whilst developing new forests and stabilising ecosystems.

There are an endless number of ways to create a forest farm because there are so many trees that perform different functions!

 

Some trees produce nuts and fruit, some fix nitrogen in the soils. All trees take Carbon out of the atmosphere to grow, and also pump carbon into the soils feeding fungi and other organisms.

 

Because of the trees ability to maintain and improve soil health, Agroforestry will be an important tool we’ll need to use in order to stop soil erosion from our current farming methods. We could plant crops in between rows of trees, or we could have a full forest garden. Forest gardens also support more insect life and bird life than our current farming systems.

 

Insects are at the base of all our food chains, so we need to make sure insects don't just survive but thrive!

Trees build and stabilise soils, preventing erosion and holding water in the landscape longer. This means forests are great for stopping flooding, as opposed to open fields which in many landscape are responsible for flooding.

Solar Foods

Making food out of thin air!

Solar foods are developing a way of making food out of just water and electricity!

The food is cultured and grown in a tank of water. The food is dried out and the final product is a flour.

 

With this technology, we can grow food that has all the protein we need. We can also produce the oils we need from fish and what we need from palm oil. This means we can stop destroying the planet through harmful means of harvesting the oceans and rainforests.

What Should You Draw?

Lets ask some questions about how food is made and how it helps us- just to get our imaginations firing...

"WE'VE SET OUT TO DISCONNECT FOOD PRODUCTION FROM AGRICULTURE."

Pasi Vainikka,

Solar Foods CEO

"A FEW HUNDRED YEARS AGO THE PEOPLE WERE TOLD THAT THE PLANET WASN'T A LIVING BEING- AT THE SAME TIME WOMEN WERE MADE SECOND CLASS CITIZENS-

THOSE TWO ASSUMPTIONS ARE BOTH RELATED AS WELL AS AT THE ROOT OF ECOLOGICAL DESTRUCTION WE SEE ALL AROUND US".

Jo Capper, collaborative curator, Grand Union Gallery.

"COLLECTIVELY, TAKE ACTIONS...

... WORKING TOGETHER, IS THE ANTIDOTE TO AN INDIVIDUALIST, CAPITALIST FORCE".

Draw/ design your own food system!

We want you to create your own ideas for:

  • How food is produced in the future (is it food still farmed? Grown? Printed? 

  • How do people eat in the future? (Are plates 

  • Dining rituals/ new food experiences (Do we still have courses? Do we use plates and cutlery?)

Imagine a home in the future, or it could be a canteen, or dining hall. It could be a business, like a cafe or restaurant... or it could be an entirely new concept! 

REMEMBER: No drawing abilities needed, just imagination and thoughtfulness!

These workshops are designed for all ages as well as individuals, friends and families.

 

Drawing ability is not important, it’s about fun, imagination and a nice big group project the whole community can work on, even when physically distant from each other. Please enjoy and send your artworks along to hipkissandgraney@outlook.com when you're done!

 

We hope you’ll enjoy this series of art workshops from Considered Mischief! If you have any questions, then please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

 

Workshop 5: Schools of Tomorrow!

Imagine you and your friends are creating your own dream school...

What would you create? What does a school need to be? What do schools need to do? What could a school be used for?

TIP: Creating environments that are truly safe and helpful to everyone is achievable when you include people of all abilities and experiences in the 

design process.

We have been learning since the beginning of humankind, but schools as we understand them are a very new concept. Let's start by looking at some examples of learning spaces throughout history...

Schools from the past

To think about schools of tomorrow, lets look at some schools from ancient history...

Hippocrates Tree

Island of Kos, Greece

C. 370 BC

2400 years ago, Hippocrates, the creator of Modern Medicine, taught students in the shade of a plane tree, on the Island of Kos. 

 

Hippocrates of Kos, was a Greek physician of the Age of Pericles. They are considered to be one of the most outstanding figures in the history of medicine.

Hippocrates extensive writings on health and the bodies ailments are where we have gained much of our medical vocabulary today.

The tree, under which Hippocrates was said to of taught medicine, was a Plane tree. 

The University of Al-Qarawiyyin,

Fez, Morocco (built in 859AD by Fatima al-Fihri)

Fatima al-Fihri was the founder of the first ever university over 1100 years ago!

From Kairouan in Tunisia, Fatima loved science and mathematics and wanted to create a space for people to research and discover, so she built the University of Al-Qarawiyyin.

 

The University of Al Qarawiyyin was built as an extension to a mosque and taught subjects like medicine and law. It was the first place in the world to give people certificates based on what they had studied.

Nalanda University

India

Nalanda lay in the ancient kingdom of Magadha, now modern-day Bihar, in India.

 

It operated as a Mahavihara, a great Buddhist monastery, but during the Gupta Empire, it flourished into a powerful centre of learning from the fifth to the twelfth century. 

The school taught logic and philosophy, medicine and ancient texts such as as Vedas and Sanskrit.

Archaeological evidence shows Nalanda consisted of a vast complex of temples, towers, halls and private quarters for students and scholars. Because of its location, the site would be shrouded in mists and the towers and highest peaks of the tallest temples would be in the clouds.

The school attracted scholars from all across Asia. Many descriptions of Nalanda still survive today. This extract is from the diary of Xuanzang, a Buddhist Monk from the 6th Century...  

"Moreover, the whole establishment is surrounded by a brick wall, which encloses the entire convent from without. One gate opens into the great college, from which are separated eight other halls standing in the middle (of the Sangharama). The richly adorned towers, and the fairy-like turrets, like pointed hill-tops are congregated together. The observatories seem to be lost in the vapours (of the morning), and the upper rooms tower above the clouds".

Would your school be like Nalanda? With people travelling far and wide to come and see the teachers? Would travellers be able to stay at the school?

Modern day schooling system

The most modern interpretation of schools, we see today, developed through a necessity to create workers that can contribute to an industry and economy.

This state education system is mandatory and free for all citizens. 

Although education is free for children, Higher Education is very expensive and is inaccessible to most people without going into debt.

The large fees needed means that there are large sections of society that are denied opportunities for Higher Education.

 

This means that education is not for everyone.

The Internet

Physical land is not something that anyone can access.

 

Land is expensive, which excludes those who are not rich, and physical spaces can also be inaccessible to those who live far away or are living with a disability. 

 

However, the internet, in theory, is a way for all people to access education and learning, from Wikipedia to the Open University.

Would your school allow you to learn where ever you were in the world? No walls or windows, or grass and trees, but instead, all exist on a device or in the air?

What Should You Draw?

Let's ask some questions about your school of the future- just to start thinking about what's important to us personally and to get our imaginations firing...

Express your idea for the future of the schools anyway you want...

How will you create your school of the future?

It can be drawings, such as landscapes and concept designs, or it could be architectural plans like blueprints! 

You can create soundscapes, or songs, craft, build, paint...

Just make sure you email your finished work into us at hipkissandgraney@outlook.com!

... because just as we all learn in different ways, we make things in different ways too...

These workshops are designed for all ages as well as individuals, friends and families.

 

Drawing ability is not important, it’s about fun, imagination and a nice big group project the whole community can work on, even when physically distant from each other. Please enjoy and send your artworks along to hipkissandgraney@outlook.com when you're done!

 

We hope you’ll enjoy this series of art workshops from Considered Mischief! If you have any questions, then please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

Workshop 6: Inventions to save the world!

For this workshop we will be building an invention together and also designing our own fantastical inventions to save the world!

Of course, you can’t save the world all by yourself, no one can... Your brilliant invention will be one of hundreds of inventions created by clever and caring people to help make the world and better place for everyone.

What Will Your Invention Be?

What problem will it solve? Maybe it will make sure there’s enough water to grow the food? Maybe it will turn harmful gases into sounds that power turbines? 

For inspiration, look outside your window and envision what is missing from the world to help people. 

Find out what problems people face in their day to day lives and design something that would help them.

Where do you keep your materials? What is your invention made out of? How will you make sure that your invention is used - where does it live? Or are there lots of them and everyone has one?

 

What is your invention called? 

Let's look at some new inventions

During this workshops series so far, we've been thinking about education, climate, energy and food, so let's look at some new inventions that address these issues.

SOCCKET is a portable, power-generating football ball designed to promote physical activity and spread awareness about the global energy issue. This new invention gets charged up during normal game play, to power its energy efficient, 3-LED lamp.

Jessica O. Matthews recalls that on the night of her aunt's wedding in Lagos, Nigeria, the power suddenly went out.

 

"They brought in a diesel generator to keep the festivities going," she says. "I started to cough and got dizzy."

 

The experience stuck with her and ultimately led her, as a junior at Harvard, to invent Soccket, a soccer ball that captures kinetic energy and stores the power in an internal generator that can light a room or charge a cell phone. Jessica O. Matthews also invented Pulse, a skipping rope that generates energy through use!

 

Jessica's goal is to "democratize on-demand power for everyone" by creating motion-based, off-grid, renewable energy. Her company will develop energy generating objects that when interacted with through everyday use create energy, for example: a baby stroller that can generate enough energy to power a cell phone!

Mariko Higaki Iwai, Inventor of Flo

Age 12 is when many girls living in poverty drop out of school. Girls miss school during menstrual bleeding because they do not have access to sanitary products and are afraid of getting teased.

For a family living in poverty disposable pads are too expensive. 90% of girls still use reusable pads and rags instead. Girls cannot was their used pads with other pads or dry them outside. This leads to bacteria and illness.

Flo is a toolkit that you can wash and dry your used pads.

The spinning action reduces the drying time and the basket inside transforms into a drying rack for use outside.

Flo also allows you to carry your used pad in from school without anyone seeing it.

To learn all about Mariko's process for creating Flo, including project criteria, their research and various stages of design, click here.

BIFOR FACE Faciity.

BIFOR is the Birmingham Institute of Forestry Research. They have built FACE.

(Free-Air Carbon-Dioxide Enrichment).

FACE allows us to take the laboratory into our woodlands.

Due to climate breakdown we will see a huge surge in Co2 in our atmosphere in the next 50 years. Trees have always been able to adapt to changing conditions and absorb carbon, but there is so much we don't understand about how this process. 

 

Climate scientists think that understanding how whole ecosystems work together to absorb and neutralise carbon will help us face some of the challenges climate breakdown will bring.

You can take a virtual tour of BIFORs FACE facility here!

Making our own inventions!

Now we've looked at some amazing inventions that are helping others and will help us save the world, let's start dreaming up our own inventions!

You don't have to create a working invention! This is all about your ideas and having fun- and make sure, anything you create, you photograph and email to us at hipkissandgraney@outlook.com to be part of the Stirchley Tapestry!

As ever, have fun and we can't wait to see what you make!

 

These workshops are designed for all ages as well as individuals, friends and families.

 

Drawing ability is not important, it’s about fun, imagination and a nice big group project the whole community can work on, even when physically distant from each other. Please enjoy and send your artworks along to hipkissandgraney@outlook.com when you're done!

 

We hope you’ll enjoy this series of art workshops from Considered Mischief! If you have any questions, then please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

Workshop 7: What will we be like?

Throughout human history, tapestries have often captured what people and their

societies were like. And what it was like during great, historic events.

For this workshop, let's draw ourselves, how we are now, how we will be, how we want to be. 

How, when this pandemic has left, will we be changed? What do we aspire to be?

What does it look like to be a better society.

Once the Corona Virus pandemic has gone, the world will be very different to what we grew up in, that's something we can't change- but what we can change is whether it is changed for the better.

The Bayeux Tapestry

Circa 1070

The Bayeux Tapestry depicts the struggle for the throne of England between William, the Duke of Normandy and Harold Godwinson, the Earl of Wessex.

 

The story begins with King of England, Edward the Confessor, designating Harold, Earl of Wessex, as his successor to the throne. Edwards decision sets into motion a series of 58 scenes, that depict the events leading upto the Norman conquest of England, the battle of Hastings and William the Conqueror's coronation as King of England. 

The Tapestry features ghostly omens, such as a burning comet in the sky and a fleet of ships that foretell the coming of a Norman invasion.

What ill omens can you draw that suggest a coming disaster in our time?

 

What would they be and can they be halted?

There are figures in the tapestry that appear to be preparing sumptuous banquets, whilst other, more noble figures savour and quaff as they celebrate their victory on the field of battle...

Soldiers and are seen to be preparing for war, whilst labourers are seen building camps and digging defences.

Holy figures are seen to be blessing occasions, such as Bishop Odo, at the Normans' first meal when they reach England.

What daily rituals would you include in a tapestry that capture our world today? Handwashing? Making masks?

What jobs can you see labourers and soldiers carrying out now?

 

Building hospitals? Carrying out testing?

Progeniture!

During this period, it was not strict protocol for the first born male to become successor to the throne (progeniture).

 

The next king would be chosen by the King and their council, known as a Witenagemot.

This tapestry captures a significant battle in European history as well as deep well of visual information into our shared medieval past.

Bayeux portrait Challenges:

The Bayeux Tapestry features lots of different people from Medieval society, during a time of turbulence. 

Draw 5 scenes of our society in 2020 that captures the current CoVid19 pandemic.

1. What was the world like before the pandemic?

You could draw yourself and your friends and family doing something you enjoy, people going to work in cars, eating in restaurants and pubs... 

OMENS! The Bayeux Tapestry features omens of ill-fate. What omens are there in our times? Floodings? Insect/ Bird populations plummitting? Melting ice caps? 

2. Draw a scene that captures the workers of this pandemic, the people that are warding us from the virus and keeping the world going.

You could draw the cleaners that are making sure places are safe for us to be in, labourers building new hospitals, the shopworkers in their masks that are making sure we can buy food, nurses and doctors that are treating the sick, the military that are testing civilians for the virus.

3. Draw our leaders during the crisis, what are they doing? How are they coping?

The Bayeux Tapestry heavily features leaders and nobles, making plans and commands. Draw our leaders now in this crisis. It could be politicians, it could be the scientists at the World Health Organisation, it could be leaders from across the globe.

4. Draw how you'd like the world to be after the Pandemic has passed.

The worldwide lockdown has led to huge improvements in air quality and great falls in carbon emissions. Many people are now realising their jobs can be done at home rather than in an office.

The virus has also further highlighted inequalities in our economy and health inequalities in our society.

Draw what kind of better world would you like to see emerge from this time of turbulence? How do we get there?

For this workshop we'll be thinking about who we are as a society, before, during and after the Covid19 pandemic.

We'll look at two examples of tapestry from the medieval period that each captured their societies in their own way and then we'll be making scenes for our own Stirchley Tapestry community project.

 

Överhogdal tapestries

1040-1170 AD

In 1909, during the renovation of a medieval church in Överhogdal, a dirty linen was discovered secreted in the Church's vestry. 

Upon hearing of the discovery, Ellen Widén, a regional heritage expert, took possession of the fabrics and had them cleaned to reveal the full tapestry.

Like many artworks of this age, the Överhogdal tapestries, seem to contain both Norse and Christian origins...

This scene looks like some kind of funeral rite is taking place. A figure is laid to rest in the centre surrounded by Norse artwork and a crowd appears to be standing in attendance. Does this signify passing or an end?

Up in the top-right corner is a small runic inscription.

Here we can see two monastic figures ringing

the bells of a chapel. At the very top of the composition you can see a crucifix.

Although the content is Christian, it's still very clearly in the art style of the Old Norse tradition.

Here, you can see Odin's horse Sleipnir... 

There are 472 human and animal figures, proceeding to the left. Where they are heading is a mystery.

The Överhgodal tapestry shows a seemingly endless procession of human and animals characters moving across a forest. The animals are all different sizes and some are gigantic!

They are all moving passed the mythical Ash tree, Yggdrasil. The tree from Norse legends that links all nine worlds.

What does the Överhogdal tapestry show?

What do you think the Överhogdal tapestry represents? What story is it trying to tell us?

... the artwork depicts 

stylized animals, dark blue

and red horses, birds

and people moving across a landscape with 

humans, tiny in

comparison walking

beside them.

A real insight into the 11th Century Viking world...

... if you were to make the Överhogdal tapestry today, about your world, what would it contain?

Överhogdal drawing Challenges:

Imagine your artwork will be discovered hundreds of years in the future... create an artwork, like the Överhogdal Tapestries that captures a glimpse into our lives today...

1. What insights into the 21st Century would offer? What would you want future people to know about us during these times?

Maybe your artwork can offer the answers to mysteries that our future selves will wonder.

2. Draw our relationship with nature in the 21st Century?

The Överhogdal tapestry illustrates a natural world in which humans are just inhabitants. The animals are seen as great and wondrous beasts with as much autonomy and personality as people.

3. Draw the changing of our world. 

 

The Överhogdal tapestry captures the shift from the Pagan world to the Christian world. We see Norse figures walking from one world to the next. We see them leaving their beliefs, rites and customs, documented, but in the past as they walk into a world filled with crucifixes and churches. 

How do you see our world changing? Our culture changing, what traditions and habits do you see us leaving behind? Mass consumption? Fossil fuels? Social and economic inequalities?

These workshops are designed for all ages as well as individuals, friends and families.

 

Drawing ability is not important, it’s about fun, imagination and a nice big group project the whole community can work on, even when physically distant from each other. Please enjoy and send your artworks along to hipkissandgraney@outlook.com when you're done!

 

We hope you’ll enjoy this series of art workshops from Considered Mischief! If you have any questions, then please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

 

What is The Stirchley Tapestry!? 

What is The Stirchley Tapestry?

The Stirchley Tapestry will be a big textile artwork made up of imagery that imagines humanities shared future after the Corona Virus has gone. It will also record society before the Virus and during.

 

We want LOTS of people to take part in this project so it can be as long as possible, at the moment we are aiming for 30 metres long and would like to exhibit the Tapestry in Stirchley Baths when it is finished.

Why is it called The "Stirchley" Tapestry?

It's called the "Stirchley" Tapestry because it is organised and fabricated within the community of Stirchley, Birmingham UK. 

 

Stirchley is a community in the industrial city of Birmingham that has an interest in social and environmental sustainability. Like many communities across the world, Stirchley has an interest in new and fun ideas that can be explored together.

Who can take part in this project?

Short answer: Anyone and everyone!

 

The Stirchley Tapestry explores ideas that affect everyone, so everyone should have a voice in this project.

Will this really be an actual Tapestry?

Short answer: No.

Long answer: Yes.

 

Throughout history, the term "tapestry" has conventionally been used to describe many different types of textile works. The Bayeux Tapestry isn't technically a tapestry, it's an embroidery!

The Stirchley Tapestry will also not technically be a tapestry. Using modern methods that are cheap and accessible, we will be digitally printing our community artworks.

 

We've chosen to do this because it's affordable and we can use the brilliant Get A Grip Studio which is based in Stirchley's Hazelwell Industrial Estate and into describe one communities journey through these strange times of human history.